Thursday, November 24, 2016

Type II Skibike lessons at Winter Park Resort Colorado

by G. Kunkel

Lenz Sport skibike lessons return to Winter Park Resort for the 2016-2017 ski season.....with some changes.

Group lessons are now only offered in the morning.  Private lessons are available in the afternoon.

Reservations for lessons and rentals are no longer  available.  All are walk-up availability only.   First come, first served.

Meet up at West Portal Rentals as usual but the time is now 8:45 with the lesson leaving promptly at 9am.

Lessons run from 9 - 11:30 am.

Hopefully this will generate less confusion and frustration for everyone.  If you are there and it isn't taken yet, it's yours.

This is a brief intro by Bryan.


© 2016 G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Google

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Skibiking Vail Pass with the Devin Lenz Crew

by G. Kunkel

Its been two seasons since this was shot but it's still a fun video.   I didn't get to go on this particular outing.

As usual, Devin is wearing a green coat but someone else is too this time.

Thanks for shooting this Andy!

 © 2016 G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.  Google

Sunday, October 16, 2016

The 2016-2017 Adaptive Epic Pass Application by Vail Resorts is now posted

by G. Kunkel

Adaptive athletes can get a super sweet deal on a 2016-2017 Epic Pass product.  And they can also buy a discounted ticket for their guide/helper as well (except A-Basin and Perisher).

Every October adaptive skiers and riders wait for the application to be published so they can apply or re-activate their old passes.

Yesterday I noticed that Disabled Sports USA published the Informational Letter and the 2016-17 Pass application on the Hartford Ski Spectacular website.  The National Adaptive Academy at Breckenridge is quickly approaching so I'm sure they were anxious as well for visiting athletes.   Vail Resorts is a major sponsor of the event.

There are a variety of adaptive pass products ranging from a few days to an unrestricted full season pass.  Prices range from $129 to $399.  One can choose from a menu of passes with different ski area restrictions.   The discounted prices are valid all season for adaptive passes and can be purchased all during the ski season.

One must establish eligibility before one can purchase the pass.  There is a long list of acceptable forms of eligibility.   My doctor typed up a simple one paragraph letter for me that asked for accommodation.  One does not need to use the official VR Physicians Form.

Stating that I'm using a skibike as an adaptive device on the application sealed the deal for them.  Vail Resorts has always been adaptive skibike friendly.

Once one has been deemed eligible and they've noted that in your online Vail Resorts profile, one can purchase the pass.  Don't worry, if you've ever purchased anything from VR and given your name, your name is in their computer system.  If not, call or email them and one quickly will be.

The pass can be picked up at any Vail Resorts Season Pass Office in Colorado, Utah, California, etc.   The pass can also be mailed to you.

In a bid to buck the system, I went to Boulder Ski Deals in Boulder, Colorado today to get mine.  It is owned by VR and I know they have a permanent Epic Pass Sales Office there.  They found my record, the eligibility note, found the pass product, and printed out my pass after forking over my credit card.

 So, if you have bad knees/back/disability and are limited to using a skibike, one is an adaptive rider.  Take advantage of this program.   It took me one phone call to Vail, one fax to Vail, and a 20 minute trip to Boulder.


 © 2016 G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Google

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Get your skibike forks serviced

by G. Kunkel

 Downhillers know this but skibikers may not.   You need to periodically have your front fork serviced.   The back shock might need service too.

Why?

The oil can leak out and if it gets too low - one could then damage the internal cartridges.   That gets REALLY expensive on a fork.  Cartridges run $70.00+.    I had oil leaking out of mine this spring- it was a big worry.

The oil does wear out as well.  You need to get it changed - just like your car.  The fork just stops functioning  correctly.   At a minimum, very active downhill mountain bikers get their oil changed once a year.

Is your bike leaking oil right now?  Best to get it serviced.

One can buy the replacement oil seals and try to do the service themselves if they have access to the proper tools.  There are plenty of YouTube videos out there.  You'll need to know the make, model, and year of manufacture of the fork to order the right size oil seals.  They come in different sizes.

A video for one Marzocchi fork model.



Not confident in your mechanical skills?  There are a number of service shops out there.  The cost runs $150-$200 for parts and labor.

If one needs quick service for a Marzocchi fork,  I can recommend Mountain Bike Forks by Mark.  He has a mail-in service and a mail order business for Marzocchi fork parts as well.  I recently got OEM Marz. oil seals for $38 including shipping from him.  Everyone else wanted $80 and they weren't OEM.

I don't own all the proper tools so I loaded up the oil seals, the skibike, and drove to Dirt Labs currently located in Boulder, Colorado.  They will be moving to Longmont in November.   I ordered my own oil seals because at that time, they couldn't get parts for Marzocchi forks.  Marzocchi went out of business last year.

I dropped off the bike at Dirt Labs on Friday and they called me on Monday afternoon and told me it was ready.  The service bill was $112 for the fork.   They also do mail-in service.   Call ahead for information.   The forms are on their website.

My oil was just beginning to get cloudy.   No cartridge damage either.  The rear shock wasn't leaking so I'm holding off on that.

I fixed the damaged ptex on my bottom of my skis and then waxed them.   Found a pair of barely used snowboard boots at a decent price.  The old ones were broken down and hurt my feet.

My bike is now ready for winter.    There's already been dustings of snow on the high peaks of Colorado.   The ski season is not far away.

© 2016 G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to G. Kunkel and A Colorado Skibiker Goes Skibiking with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. Google